Rome: The Italian newspaper "Il Foglio" reported on Friday on the disorder with links between leaders of Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the Movement for the Uniqueness and Jihad in West Africa (Mujao) and Ansar Eddine and department of Algerian Intelligence and Security (DRS).

"Almost all the chiefs of AQIM, the Mujao and the Tuareg Salafist group Ansar Eddine had links with Algerian DRS officials, led by General Rashid Laalali," the newspaper said. 

"With the operation Serval (led by France in Mali), secret agreements and compromises, through which the DRS had managed to keep the groups affiliated to Al Qaeda outside Algerian territory and to operate the business according to its own objectives ,  "says" Il Foglio "from the pen of journalist and expert on defense issues, Pio Pompa. 

The author of the article states that "the first result of this failure was the operation of In-Amenas, not only because of its tragic and bloody epilogue, but a truth that the Algerian authorities even admit : the head of the suicide bomber was a jihadi Sahrawi the Algerian secret services knew from the time he was active in Polisario ". 

"Revealing his identity would eventually permanently compromise both the image of the separatist movement and the Islamists who become a major source of recruitment, the casual strategy adopted by the Algerian secret services to assert their own prerogatives throughout Africa north and the Sahel, "he says by analysing recent Algerian official statements that the situation in Mali represents a serious threat to Algeria. 

This strategy, the newspaper said, was also behind the events that have marked the dismantling of Gdeim Izik "in which a dozen unarmed Moroccan policemen were brutally massacred by the Polisario militia in connection with the Algerian DRS ". 

With regard to the trial of those involved in these events, "Il Foglio" recalled that the Moroccan government has made attendance at hearings available to 52 international observers and various NGOs who admitted that the trial was fair and surrounded by all the guarantees the accused. 

"This is a setback for the Algerians plus the fact that many of the jihadist leaders who fled northern Mali sought refuge in camps in Tindouf, southern Algeria," observes the author of the article. 

 

02/03/2013